Dentist - Andover
2 Elm Square, Suite 202,
Andover, MA 01810
 

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Posts for: June, 2014

By Browell & Murphy - Andover Dental Group LLC
June 27, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TheImportanceofSavingImpactedCanineTeeth

Your upper canine teeth are pretty easy to identify — they’re usually longer and more pointed than other front teeth, and are normally positioned just under the eyes (hence their other name, eyeteeth). Besides helping us chew and bite our food, upper canines are part of a normal smile — when they don’t appear in the mouth (erupt) properly, the person’s smile may appear unnatural or “off.”

Unfortunately, upper canines can become impacted, meaning the teeth have grown and developed in positions that prevent them from erupting. Because impacted teeth can develop abscesses and cysts, or damage the roots of neighboring teeth, it’s necessary to treat them.

The first step is a thorough orthodontic evaluation to assess not only the teeth in question, but also how they could affect the position of other teeth in the future. Next, we must locate the exact position of the impacted canines through some form of radiographic examination, either x-rays or 3-D imaging using a cone beam CT scanner (CBCT). This evaluation will determine our treatment options for these teeth.

If the teeth are in a reasonable position, the best option is to expose the impacted tooth and prepare it for movement into proper position. To expose the tooth, a surgeon creates a small, surgical opening or flap in the gum tissue closest to the crown of the tooth. Once gaining access, the surgeon then bonds a small bracket to the crown and attaches a small gold chain to it. The chain can then be looped over orthodontic hardware attached to adjacent teeth, which will pull the impacted tooth over time into the proper position. Although this may sound complicated, coaxing the impacted canine in this manner into a proper eruption is actually quite routine and predictable.

If at all possible, saving impacted upper canine teeth should be the primary treatment goal — extracting them could have an adverse effect on biting and chewing, as well as disrupting your appearance. If they must be removed, however, tooth replacement such as dental implants can help restore any lost form or function.

If you would like more information on impacted teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Exposing Impacted Canines.”


ChildStarNolanGouldTalksAboutToothExtractionsOrthodonticTreatment

Nolan Gould of the hit TV show Modern Family has an uncommon gift for comedy, but he also has a very common orthodontic problem: too many teeth for the size of his mouth, which often results in “crowding.”

“My teeth used to be pretty messed up,” Nolan recently told Dear Doctor magazine in an exclusive interview. “I had two extra teeth when I was born. They hadn't come out (erupted) yet. And all the other teeth that were already there were starting to point backwards because it was getting so crowded in my mouth. They had to remove those two (extra) teeth,” he said.

Although being born with extra teeth is somewhat unusual, needing to have teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons is not. In fact, orthodontic treatment often involves removing teeth to relieve crowding. It makes sense when you think about it: When there are too many teeth for the size of the dental arches (upper and/or lower jaws) or the teeth are larger in size than the dental arch can accommodate, there may not be enough space to align them properly. The necessary space can be created by removing teeth.

The teeth most frequently extracted for orthodontic reasons are the first bicuspid teeth. These are the ones right between the cuspid, or eyeteeth (under the eyes) and the molars (biggest back teeth). Once there is enough space, the orthodontist can choose from a variety of orthodontic appliances to align the teeth, depending on the specific needs of the individual.

In Nolan's case, it was the extra two teeth he was born with that were removed. Afterwards, the young actor's orthodontist was able to shift Nolan's remaining teeth into proper alignment using orthodontic appliances called Crozats. Made of metal wires, Crozats go around the back teeth and behind the front teeth, making them virtually invisible.

“You can remove them, which is really good for acting, especially because you can't see them,” Nolan explained. “I can wear them 24/7 and nobody will ever notice.”

Nolan's orthodontic appliances may not be noticeable, but his fabulous smile certainly is!

If you would like to learn more about improving tooth alignment with orthodontics, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. If you would like to read Dear Doctor's entire interview with Nolan Gould, please see “Nolan Gould.” Dear Doctor also has more on “Tooth Removal for Orthodontic Reasons.”


By Dr. Murphy
June 05, 2014
Category: Cerec
Tags: crowns   Single visit  

A trip to the dentist for some people can be a very stressful experience. We all know that we have to go at least 2 times a year for a check-up and to get our teeth cleaned. Occasionally, we may have to return for another visit to get a cavity restored or have an old filling replaced. It is when the unexpected happens…the biting down on something and hearing a crack, or feeling something hard in our food that shouldn’t be there, that fills most of most of us with anxiety.

 

A broken tooth use to mean a couple of visits to the dental office. There first was being told that you have a broken tooth and now need a crown, the tooth would be temporarily fixed until you were able to come back. At the next appointment, we would prep your tooth, take an impression, fit your tooth with a temporary, and schedule you to come back in a couple of weeks for the final crown. Hopefully your temp crown would not come off before then.

 

With CAD/CAM technology (CEREC) and advanced porcelain and ceramic materials, gone are the days of multiple appointments.  Our office has been using this technology since 2000, and has produced thousands of conservative, esthetic, and metal free restorations in a single visit.

Cerec also allows us to be more judicious in our design, and in many instances that fractured tooth may not need a full crown, but a more conservative ¾ crown/onlay, thereby preserving healthy tooth structure. Once the tooth is prepared we will then take a color video scan of your teeth creating a   computer model on which we will design your new porcelain crown/onlay.  We will then bond your new restoration to your tooth using a light cured cement and then you will be able to use your new crown/onlay immediately. What use to take us 2-3 weeks to accomplish, can now be completed in less than 2 hours.